Understanding Veterinary Compounding and Modern Uses

Compounding is mixing customized prescription medications and treatments when alternatives are not available. It is nothing new to medicine, but advances in technology have made the practice more versatile and cost-effective. Today, compounding is a new take on an “old school” method. Before medications were massed produced, pharmacists located in the apothecary shop would mix prescriptions as individuals arrived with a prescription.

Mass Production

The mass manufacturing and marketing of most prescription drugs became easier, faster, and cheaper. Compounding is still done, but only when a patient cannot use the available medications. It is used in some treatments, nuclear medicine procedures, and when a precise dose is needed. Compounding for veterinary uses is increasing in demand and providing a solution to many problems or special cases.

Prescription medications that are mass produced have limitations because they are made to accommodate common illnesses or conditions for average patients, both human and animal. In veterinary medicine, if a drug is no longer profitable to make in mass quantities, manufacturers will discontinue it.

Filling in Gaps

That leaves a gap in the accessibility and availability of that medication for animals who benefit from it. Compounding can duplicate that medication in small batches, or a single dose, when necessary. It can also solve ongoing issues with dosing, delivery, and unique needs of animals large and small. Understanding Veterinary Compounding is to realize all the benefits offered in current times.

Many veterinarians in remote areas do not have the medications and treatments needed to provide effective care. Whether it is the Australian Outback or a sheep farm in the Shetlands, vets have problems with accessibility. Prescriptions can be entered online to the compounding company. The company then custom mixes the ingredients and sends it to the vet for administration.

Uses for Pets

Pets have their own personalities, preferences, and medical needs. Compounding is a way to accommodate all needs, no matter how unique. That rescued horse on the family farm may refuse to accept anything given by hand but loves to be brushed. Medication that can be delivered through the skin (transdermal) is effective and will not cause trauma to the animal. Flavored, smaller, and alternative medications are all available via compounding.