Art Websites For Work

At the forefront of the online art revolution are a handful of websites that have transcended the individual artist or gallery web page mentality and evolved into massive clearinghouses of information. The best among them offer artists hundreds and sometimes thousands of ways to get informed, get exposure, make connections, organize their efforts, and advance their careers.

Founder and webmaster Richard Collins brought it online in May 1996 with a couple of pages. It has since grown to one hundred pages with over 2,000 links where sculptors can obtain information on virtually any topic having to do with the discipline. (Note posted March 2008: this website has changed ownership and is substantially different than it originally was.)

Collins’ mission is to define today’s sculpture industry and spotlight where within that industry efficiencies can be gained. He believes that by assembling numerous resources in one place, sculptors can save money and more effectively do business. They can use the site to locate and comparison shop for supplies, service providers, and outlets for their work better than ever before. has links to tools, techniques, technologies, resources, organizations, legal issues, foundries, jobs wanted or needed, conservation and preservation of sculpture, sculpture as a business, and much more.

For people who want to see what’s available in the marketplace, has links to 300 individual sculptor pages. Collins is in the process of reviewing 500 additional individual sites for possible inclusion– 100 belonging to artists who have asked to be linked and 400 of sculptors he’s found in his own online searches. He has also linked about 100 commercial galleries and has located an additional 1000 online, but is primarily focused on individual sculptors at this time.

From a technological standpoint, perhaps the most fascinating links on the site are to machine replication services. These businesses use computers to design sculptures from scratch and also to work directly from models. They are able to scan models with 3-d scanners and either reduce, enlarge, or alter them. Finished designs can be “printed” or cut out at any time using robotic systems. Twelve such companies are currently listed.

Collins also helps sculptors establish better web presences as few are capable of doing so on their own. He’s invested hundreds of pro bono hours in these online projects and as a result, experiences periodic financial difficulties. In order to more effectively serve the community, he’s currently seeking funding and developing ways to generate onsite income. gets about 30,000 hits per month, 10,000 of which are classified as visitors– people who view multiple pages. Although Collins does not have much in the way of hard data, he says that business is resulting from “sculptors wanted” ads placed by people and companies looking to commission family or animal portraits, public works, and commercial pieces. Special effects film companies have also advertised for sculptors. Individual sculptors report increased traffic from being linked to the site and may be getting commissions as a result. Links to foundries, tool companies, and materials suppliers also get a high number of hits and are probably making sales.

An early example of a grass roots community website, no longer operational, was the San Francisco Bay Area’s The site was not about selling art, but rather about bringing local artists together and giving them opportunities to get their art out into the public. Its mission was to create and maintain an online community for Bay Area Artists, to educate and connect people to the region’s art and artists, and to promote Bay Area art. Its geographic focus was very specific, extending South to Santa Cruz, through Oakland, San Jose and San Francisco, North to Ukiah, and East to Sacramento. No events outside of this area were posted. maintained hundreds of links to information about art classes, art techniques, shows, events, jobs, articles, places to hang art (cafes, public spaces, galleries along with contact information), resources for art supplies, art classifieds, studio spaces, forums, competitions, and calls for art. Artists were able post their shows at no charge. Link exchanges between this and related sites were free.

One of the highlights of was their “mailing list.” Every week, they emailed detailed information about ongoing shows, opening receptions, closing shows, art classes, lectures, and demonstrations to anyone who asked. Subscriptions were free– all recipients had to do was provide their email addresses. About 1000 artists and members of the art community were subscribed. This allowed them to stay informed without ever having to log onto the website.

Artistresource received no funding and was maintained by an average of six volunteers, some of whom lived outside of the Bay Area. In exchange for volunteering or submitting articles, artists were allowed to post portfolios of their work. The site received about 3000 hits per week.

Many visitors to used it to keep track of and attend local art events. Art students, of which there are thousands in the Bay Area, found the site especially helpful in navigating the art community. Artists who linked experienced increased traffic to their websites and those who advertised reported positive results such as finding students for their workshops and locating studio space.

At the opposite end of the continuum from non-profit endeavors like is This massive for-profit site has been at the forefront of the online art business ever since it first appeared in 1989. It was originally a dial-up service for an auction record database that enabled dealers and collectors to research art prices online. It has since expanded to encompass virtually every aspect of the today’s high-end art market. (Note posted March 2008: this website is bigger and better than ever, and improves every day.)

According to spokesperson Bill Fine, Artnet currently has links to 80 percent, or about 700, of the art galleries that regularly advertise in the world’s major art magazines. This makes the site unquestionably the best one-stop gallery shopping center on the web. A sophisticated search engine allows visitors to access galleries in a variety of ways including by name, location, specialties, artist names, current exhibitions, and types of art. Gallery rates for an Artnet website start at $2000. Galleries that already have their own websites can link to Artnet for $1000 per year.

In addition to galleries, Artnet also hosts and maintains about 100 web pages for individual artists. Fine says that the main reasons artists use this service are to get representation, make themselves accessible to major galleries, and sell art. For $1000, an artist can post ten images along with biographical and contact information for a period of one year or 30 works for $2000. Any artist interested in establishing a presence on Artnet should read on-site testimonials beforehand and contact current users in order to assess possible advantages or disadvantages.

One of the site’s most impressive features is Artnet Magazine, the internet’s premier online art periodical. It’s updated at the amazing rate of twenty to forty new pages per business day and contains everything from feature articles, current exhibitions, commentaries, and reviews, to detailed monthly artist horoscopes. Artnet Magazine is as sophisticated and informative as any major art publication, has acquired cyberrights to a number of the best articles and art writers around, and has hundreds of pages in its archives.

Artnet’s auction record database, meanwhile, has grown to nearly 2,000,000 individual sales records of works of art by 160,000 artists. Numerous entries are accompanied by pictures much as they are in auction catalogues. This too is the best online research resource of its kind. Subscribers have unlimited access to the database for $19.95 per month, although that will likely change to a per-use fee in the near future.

Artnet has links to the world’s major art fairs, museums, current exhibitions at its member galleries, chat capabilities, art services, and more. They are expanding into new areas of collecting and have begun hosting sites for dealers in antiques, ancient art, and tribal art. Two of their most recent additions are online art auctions and an art bookstore with over 12,000 titles.

The site averages 1,200,000 hits per week, about 300,000 of which are multiple page views. Substantial art sales are being made through participating galleries although dollar figures are not available. Most reported sales are to collectors searching for art by particular artists. Several individual artists have reported selling art to collectors who first saw their work online. Artnet auction selling prices average in the low to mid thousands of dollars per piece with one isolated watercolor on canvas fetching an impressive $168,000.

Here are some tips for anyone thinking about establishing an effective multi-purpose website:

  •  Know more than basic web design or hire someone who does.
  • Keep it simple. Large text or image files and moving or spinning graphics increase download time and decrease viewer interest.
  •  Stay focused. Don’t expand into too many unrelated areas.
  • Update regularly. If viewers see the same information over and over again, they’ll get bored and stop coming.
  • *Figure out the minimum amount of money and/or volunteer hours necessary to keep things going. Don’t expect revenues to pour in from outside sources. Generating online income is difficult.

How overpriced can art be at these galleries?

I asked a former sales consultant who spent years working at one such gallery on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, CA. “Signed and numbered, mechanically reproduced posters can be marked up 100 times or more,” he. “A poster costing only $10 to produce, is sometimes sold to the public for over $1000.

“Unsigned, unnumbered, limited edition etchings or lithographs by major twentieth-century artists can be marked up as many as forty times,” he continues. “For example, a Chagall lithograph that costs a gallery $100 might sell for $4000 including the frame. Art by artists like Peter Max, Erte, or Alexandra Nechita, can be marked up four times or more. This means that a painting consigned to a gallery for $10,000 might sell for over $40,000.

“To be fair,” this former employee adds, “high profile galleries have tremendous overheads. Some pay $60,000 or sometimes substantially more per month in rent alone.” The bottom line, however, is that in the overwhelming majority of cases, 70 to well over 90 percent of what you pay for art at art-target galleries does not go to the art or to the artists, but rather to rent, utilities, furnishings, framing, staff salaries, champagne and brie for art openings, and other gallery expenses. For example, if you pay $4000 for an unsigned unnumbered Chagall lithograph that the gallery bought for $100, it’s only worth $100 the moment it leaves the gallery, and you’ve just wasted $3900.

Through his gallery experiences, he– and all other seasoned owners and employees– know exactly who buys this overpriced art. While working at that Rodeo Drive gallery, he would keep his eye out for people sporting Rolex watches, alligator shoes, designer handbags, and other overt displays of wealth. “Well-dressed married couples in their forties and fifties are also likely buyers,” he adds. “But not newlyweds, and you never talk to people with back packs or rubber shoes, or to artists. They’re all wastes of time.”

While he worked at the gallery, he would typically strike up conversations with likely art targets and start by “qualifying” them, in other words, finding out whether they could afford the art they were looking at. Below are typical questions that art-target gallery sales staff (euphemistically called associates or consultants– which they are not) use to “qualify” buyers.

* “So, are you in town for the medical convention?” (A medical convention may or may not be taking place, but this is a great lead-in to finding out what someone does for a living and getting an idea of how much money they make.)

* “Have you ever bought art before?” (A “yes” answer is better than a “no,” but a “no” still allows the sales associate to continue the conversation by asking what artists they like the most, whether they’re familiar with any of the art they’re looking at, and so on.)

* A “yes” answer to the above question leads to the next question which goes something like “Where do you buy your art?” (Knowing where a person buys art is critical to making a sale. According to this former gallery associate, people who buy directly from artists are unlikely to buy at galleries. If, however, they buy at galleries similar to the one where he once worked, the chances of selling them art are much greater.)

* Assuming the art-target buys at higher profile galleries or has at least thought about it, the next question goes something like “Who are your favorite artists?” (If the person mentions names of artists or types of art that the gallery sells, this is good.)

Additional ways of qualifying art targets are beyond the scope of this article, but anyone who qualifies and shows interest in the gallery’s art is given immediate attention. A sales associate shadows the art target and either continues the conversation or remains in the art target’s vicinity making occasional remarks about whatever art is being looked at. The associate is trained to make the art target feel important, and when combined with the impressive trappings of the gallery’s lavish interior, the art target becomes seduced, tenderized, and readied to be sold to.

The sales person pays close attention to the way the art target looks at the art, prepared to spring into action at any moment, and move in for the kill the instant more than a casual amount interest is expressed in a particular piece of art. The associate’s goal is to remove that piece of art from the main gallery and suggest that the art-target study it more closely in a place called the “viewing room.”

The viewing room is usually a smaller room off of the main gallery floor with a door that can be closed for privacy. It’s specially designed for isolating art targets alone with their sales associates, and for showing art so that it looks its absolute finest. At one end of the room is a display area with sophisticated lighting where the art is positioned for viewing. The art target is seated across from and facing the art, usually on a comfortable couch, while the associate adjusts the lighting to perfection, all the while talking about how great the artist is and how fantastic the art looks. Under these circumstances, the art target is most vulnerable and the associate eventually pops the question “Would you prefer to pay for that with a VISA, MasterCard, or American Express?”

Viewing rooms are not good places for art targets to find themselves in unless they already know the value and significance of the works of art that they’re thinking about buying, or they know and trust the gallery that’s selling the art and have done business with them before. Below are additional tips, not only for avoiding viewing rooms, but also for avoiding becoming an art-target in any way, shape or form.

** Art-target galleries like the one where this individual worked are usually found in high traffic, high profile, commercial areas that attract wealthy people. Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, the Soho district of New York City, Fisherman’s Wharf and Union Square in San Francisco, and high-end tourist destinations like Carmel, CA and Honolulu, HI all have these types of galleries. Cruise ship art auctions are the high-seas version of art-target galleries.

** The substantial majority of art-target galleries are located at street level. Their opulent interiors are clearly visible through large picture windows and through glass doors that are often open to the street.

** Art-target galleries typically show art by artists with high name recognition like Leroy Neiman, Erte, Thomas Kinkade, Peter Max, Dali, and Alexandra Nechita. They also show prints by “Modern Masters” such as Picasso, Chagall, Matisse, and Miro; and, occasionally, prints by Impressionists like Degas, Monet, and Pissaro; or etchings by Old Masters like Rembrandt.

** Many of the unsigned prints sold at art-target galleries are mass edition lithographs removed from books or portfolios, posthumous printings (printings done after the artists are dead); some are even copies of works by famous artists done by other artists. All have very modest street value. Inexperienced collectors who buy these types of limited edition prints at art-target galleries often have little or no idea of what they’re really getting.

** Art-target sales people use pressure tactics to sell art (many work entirely on commission, so the only way they make money is to sell you art). Anytime you feel any pressure from an associate, no matter how subtle, to carry on a conversation, talk about yourself, and especially, to buy art, leave immediately. Questions about your credit limit or your financial situation are also immediate signals to leave. Depending on the sex of the associate and the target, pressure can even include flirting. By way of contrast, in the non-target art world, gallery personnel normally leave you alone when you look like you don’t want to be approached.

** Always ask your sales associate whether or not he or she works on commission. If they waffle on the answer, get it in writing. As stated above, many art-target sales associates work on commission. In other words, the more art they sell, the more money they make. And the more they sell that art for, the more money they make. So the goal of a commissioned art associate or sales person is to sell you as much art as expensively as possible. Recommendation: Do not patronize galleries whose sales personnel work on commission.

** Art-target galleries often have high profile art openings with security guards, spotlights, champagne, hors d’oeuvres, cameras flashing, and people at desks in the fronts of the galleries welcoming you, asking you questions and signing you in. Sales associates run around with clipboards, ready to sell. Likely art targets are waited on hand-and-foot, the entire event being designed to make them feel very, very important… and then to buy art.

** At art-target openings, gallery personnel typically stop you at the door and request personal information, ask you to sign in, or ask how you heard about the opening. Requests for personal information are always warning signs. Non art-target galleries rarely engage in such practices. You are being sized up for a hard sell– never forget this.

** Art-target galleries typically stay open well into the night when giddy revelers, out on the town and with money to spend, are likely to wander in after enjoying good food and fine wines at expensive restaurants. Two cardinal rules of intelligent art collecting, by the way, are never to buy art at night and never to buy it under the influence of drugs or alcohol.

Being an art target can be loads of fun at the moment you’re buying art, but finding out what that art is worth months or years down the road when you decide you want to sell it or have it appraised is anything but fun. Of course, you’re entitled to buy whatever art you like, wherever you see it for sale, and pay whatever you want to pay for it. But if you care about the value of what you’re buying and how you spend your money, resist any pressure to buy, take your time, do a little price research in advance, or ask an outside appraiser to do it for you before you become an art target.

Museums Can Make Art a Tough Give

In 1988, William Jordan saw a portrait in a catalog from a London auction house. The work was attributed to Justus Sustermans, a Flemish painter in the Medici court in Florence. But as an art historian, Mr. Jordan was sure it was actually a work by the 17th-century master Diego Velázquez.

He bought the painting for 1,000 pounds — much less than a Velázquez would have cost — and had it shipped to his home in Dallas, where it was cleaned and reframed. And there it hung for nearly 30 years.

Last year, his hunch was validated. The Prado Museum in Madrid, which owns a third of all of Velázquez’s works, said Mr. Jordan’s painting was the real thing.

Mr. Jordan then did something many art collectors dream of doing: He donated the work, worth an estimated $6 million, to the Prado, where it was quickly put into a show of Velázquez’s work. In addition to the exhibition, which runs through the fall, Mr. Jordan received a catalog filled with scholarly essays on the work and accompanying photos. And to top it off, he will be eligible for a tax deduction because the donation was made not to a foreign museum but to the American Friends of the Prado Museum, a United States-based charity.

If this seems like the way collectors typically sail through donations of art, think again. Mr. Jordan’s tale sounds like some supercharged episode of “Antiques Roadshow,” but most collectors struggle to donate their art, even valuable art, to museums.

Or as Evan Beard, national art services executive for U.S. Trust, put it: “If you have a Picasso worth $6 million or $7 million, every museum in the country will say thank you, thank you, thank you.” For other works, particularly collections of mixed quality, there is likely to be a negotiation.

It’s a lot easier to donate art when the museum asks for it first. “My clients who have donated to museums have had really long-term relationships with the museums,” said Nilani Trent, an art adviser in Manhattan. “They’ve been part of the museum for many, many years. Usually, the museum has approached them and said, ‘This is a weak part of our collection.’”

Stephanie Ingrassia, who is a trustee of the Brooklyn Museum of Art, which named a contemporary art gallery after her and her husband, Tim, made her first donation to the museum in 2007. It was a work by a well-known feminist artist, Ana Mendieta, called “Untitled (Guanaroca [First Woman]).”

The process was fairly painless because the museum did not have a piece of art by such a significant artist, Ms. Ingrassia said.

“It’s a piece that I loved, but my family didn’t really understand,” she said of the work, which is a photo of a vagina carved in sand. “It was very well received. It’s often on view.”

Since then, Ms. Ingrassia, 52, has donated about 10 works, and contributed money with other trustees toward additional pieces. But she said her interest — contemporary art — dovetailed with an area where the museum was expanding.

Other donations have a more difficult time getting approval. “We’re being very careful with what comes into the collection,” Ms. Ingrassia said. “We used to be a place where Grandma’s furniture ended up.”

Being turned down is a reality, though, for any collector. Ms. Trent has been trying to help a client donate his art to museums so that he can change the nature of his collection. His offers have been rejected.

“It’s not that they’re bad,” she said. “It’s that they don’t fill a hole.”

If a museum is on the fence about a donation or collection, it might ask for additional money in the form of an endowment to accept the art.

“The first thing people are surprised with is when the museum comes back and says, ‘I’ll take your painting if you give us an added endowment to care for the work of art,’” Mr. Beard said. “Usually, a museum will want one or two specific items in your collection to fill gaps, and they look at everything else as cost because they’re going to have to store it.”

Being asked for money after offering works of art may sound ungrateful. But museums are bound to maintain — and not sell off — their collections, and storing all the pieces they cannot show can cost thousands of dollars a year.

Yet Mr. Beard said the request for a significant sum could also be a signal to collectors that they should look elsewhere. “Is it better to go for a midsize regional museum where your works will be a focus,” he asked, “or an encyclopedic museum where your works will see the light of day every five years?”

Of course, museums are not the only place to donate art. Collectors can donate to charities where the art may be displayed or sold to finance projects. Jane Wilton, general counsel of the New York Community Trust, said the organization was given hundreds of works by Joaquín Torres-García in 1992.

The collector who donated the art wanted it to be used to pay for research into AIDS and H.I.V. And it did, though it took the community trust nearly 15 years to sell it all.

Institutions may push back on gifts for another reason: fear of provenance or authenticity. Antiquities are particularly fraught, given patrimony laws that protect artifacts.

“You may have some great Egyptian artifacts and you’d love to have them in the museum when you die, because who else is going to take them?” Mr. Schindler said. “But if you don’t have good proof that they came out of the ground before 1970, good luck.”

And there is the risk that cherished works of art are not real. Ms. Wilton said one such piece hangs in her office as a reminder to be diligent in evaluating bequests. “It’s supposed to be by Winslow Homer,” she said. “It turned out to be a Homer Simpson.”

One big benefit is whether the institution provides a tax deduction. If the work goes to a museum, the donor gets the full deduction. If it goes to a nonprofit where art is not central to the mission, the donor is eligible only for the value of the piece when it was purchased.

In 2014, a group of Spanish-art enthusiasts set up the American Friends of the Prado Museum, which promotes the museum in the United States. But it has the added benefit of ensuring that donors get a tax deduction for their gift, which they are technically donating to an American nonprofit organization that in turn lends it to the Prado. (The Louvre and the Vatican Library have similar 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organizations in the United States.)

Mr. Jordan, who was the deputy director of the Kimbell Art Museum in Fort Worth when he bought the Velázquez, is not, by his own admission, a wealthy man. But he said he had known every director of the Prado since the 1970s and wanted the museum have the piece.

“The museum has had a long relationship with Bill Jordan,” said Miguel Falomir, director of the Prado. “He’s not just a collector. He’s a scholar. He’s collaborated with us. He’s created exhibitions. He’s an old friend of the museum.”

Case Study: My Experience With Songs

Advantages Of Movie Soundtracks

There are many requirements that you should meet when you aim at producing a good movie that will be able to receive a positive reception from the masses, and one of them is making several soundtracks that communicate the theme of various themes during the movie and then putting them in the appropriate place. It is important that you should hire professional artists and music producers who can work together to ensure that you achieve high-quality sound tracks which can only improve the ability of the movie to impress those who are going to watch it and therefore make it more popular.

When you have a famous artist singing a particular soundtrack on one of your films; you increase the marketability of the movie because the audience will be more interested in watching the movie just because their favorite singer has been involved in the project. Involvement of famous acts which contribute to the soundtracks has proved to be effective in making the movie sell as shown by A wrinkle In Time Soundtrack which has songs done by some great musicians. There are many important facts about why you are supposed to put unique soundtracks within a movie and also having them placed at the appropriate scenes as the movie progresses.

The first advantage is the fact that well though soundtracks will be able to draw an audience into a particular emotional state which will make them receive the message of the movie in such a way that they feel as If they are part of the scenes that are happening in the movie. Examples of the common emotional reactions that can be triggered by a good soundtrack include the ability for the audience to be made to share in the happiness, the sad moments as well as the confusion that the actors have gone into due to the scenes that have or are happening in the movie.

Another thing is that the soundtracks have an ability of creating a clear impression of the period through which a movie is going depending on the scenes preceding that soundtrack or what is expected after it is over. There are songs that can be used in the introduction to show the audience that the movie just started, those used during the movie to show that there are other events about to happen in the movie and there are those songs that are designed to show that movie is actually at the end and there cannot be any other scene after it ends.

Lastly, the soundtracks can also be used to provide the audience with ample time by describing different activities that are going on in the movie so that the people watching can be able to understand where the movie is heading to in terms of the things expected to happen.

Benefits of Understanding Veterinary Compounding for Pet Owners

Taking the time to learn about compounding medications is well worth it for pet owners and their pets. Understanding Veterinary Compounding empowers owners to advocate for their pets and discuss compounding possibilities with veterinarians. The term compounding simply refers to mixing ingredients to tailor-make prescription medications for unique needs. The practice has been done to some degree in medical science for decades.

A Brief History

Compounding was common practice before prescription drugs were manufactured in mass quantities. Doctors wrote prescriptions for patients who would then take them to an apothecary shop. The owner of the shop mixed up the ingredients right then and gave the medication to the patient.

The manufacturing of prescriptions became faster, easier, and more cost-effective. Compounding was relegated to use in unique situations. Treatments and medications have always been mixed individually for patients with allergies, intolerance, or those in need of specialized dosing.

Increasing Demand by Veterinarians

Many veterinarians, especially those in remote or rural areas, do not have access to the medications needed to treat a wide variety of pets, cattle, farm animals, and even zoo animals. The medications may be out of stock or discontinued altogether. Medications are discontinued by manufacturers when they fail to be profitable. Unfortunately, so animals still benefit from those medications. A compounding company can duplicate discontinued medications when needed.

Benefits to Pet Owners

Compounding is a solution to unique dosing needs. It is also a way to eliminate unwanted ingredients in medications, such as dyes, sugar, and preservatives. This can be essential for animals with allergies, chronic conditions, or intolerance to common ingredients like lactose. Pet owners can ask veterinarians about alternative administration formats when pets cannot or will not swallow pills, or have problems accepting liquids.

Owners can also advocate for the best care possible for their pets circumstances and preferences. Medications can be flavored to avoid the trauma of trying to get pets to take regular medications. If a pet was found at a shelter, it could have been abused in the past. Holding a dog down while trying to force its mouth open could be dangerous and stressful for both owner and pet.

A Brief Guide to Understanding Pharmaceutical Compounding for Pet Owners

There’s one thing that all pet owners have in common: they all want what’s best for their companion animals when it comes to healthcare. Veterinarians understand that pets are members of their owners’ families, which is why they offer sophisticated solutions to ensure that all animals in their care receive the best treatment possible. Compounding for pet owners is one medically and technologically sophisticated method of improving veterinary care.

What is Compounding?

Pharmacy compounding is the process of preparing custom medications for patients. When this process is used to alter pharmaceutical medications intended for use on animals, it is known as veterinary compounding. This solution is particularly popular among veterinarians, as medicating pets often presents unique challenges that doctors who care for human patients need not consider.

Flavored Medicine

Many pets refuse to take their medications due to unpleasant tastes. This issue can be easily solved via compounding, as nearly any dog will be more than happy to take medications that are flavored to taste like his or her favorite meaty treats. Altering flavors is certainly not the only thing compounding is good for, though.

Controlling Dosage

Dosages can be difficult to determine in animals that come in a wide variety of sizes, such as dogs. Compounding allows veterinarians to tailor medication dosages to an animal’s unique needs so that owners of six-pound Yorkies need not fear over-medicating due to the use of pharmaceuticals intended for much bigger Golden Retrievers or Labs.

Application Methods

Some issues can’t be solved by changing the dosage of a medication or adding flavor. For instance, cats are known for carefully avoiding necessary medications even when they are hidden in their favorite foods. Compounding allows veterinarians to prescribe pharmaceutical drugs in different forms so that medications that are usually administered orally can be given via a different method.

Commercially Unavailable Medicines

Sometimes it is just not possible to find the right medications to treat a pet’s condition on the commercial market. This is most frequently due to cost concerns on behalf of the producers, as it just isn’t cost-effective to mass-produce medications that are only required in rare cases. Compounding pharmacists are able to prepare custom prescriptions for veterinarians so that they can still have access to these useful drugs in treating pets.

Understanding Veterinary Compounding and its Benefits

The term veterinary compounding refers to the process of manipulating pharmaceutical drugs to make them more accessible for treatment of animals. Common forms of manipulation include adding flavoring to make common medications easier to administer orally, diluting or concentrating drugs for use with larger or smaller animals, combining multiple medications into one single-dose application, and making changes that allow the drugs to be administered in different ways. The key to Understanding Veterinary Compounding is to consider the many benefits that it confers upon veterinarians and their patients.

Advantages for Veterinarians

Just about every veterinarian out there wants to offer the best possible care to his or her animal patients. Unfortunately, this can be impossible when the medications required to treat or cure a condition are unavailable or are not formulated for use on animals. Compounding gives these animal health care professionals access to a nearly limitless source of medications that are specifically tailored to meet their patients’ needs.

One common example might be the need to titrate a medication that was designed for a large dog to the unique needs of, say, a Chihuahua. In addition to changing a drug’s concentration, though, scientists who focus on veterinary compounding can also alter the drug to make it appropriate for different types of application. For example, cats are notorious for taking poorly to oral medication, so a veterinarian might have a necessary drug compounded for transdermal application.

Benefits for Pets and Other Animals

Veterinary compounding can be a life-saving procedure for many animals who would not otherwise have access to the medications they need to treat or manage their conditions. Thus, the animals themselves can benefit from veterinary compounding through improved health and easier application of medications, since their vets can order doses that are specifically tailored to the animal’s unique needs. For example, a larger animal such as a horse or even an elephant could be treated effectively using compounded medications that were created using drugs intended for canine or feline consumption, provided they have been proven safe for use in larger mammals.

Benefits for Pet Owners

The primary benefit for pet owners is that they get the reassurance that they are doing everything possible to keep their pets healthy and comfortable. Keep in mind though, that only a veterinarian can order compounded medications.

Nicholas Bova Leads Campaign to Help Veterinary Care Specialists with a Shortage of Available Options

Compounding medicine in veterinary care is dramatically helping in various niche areas. Bova Compounding has found a resolute answer to an ongoing dilemma in veterinary treatment. No matter where one rests on the spectrum of animal care, there is a shortage. Somewhere and somehow, access to traditional treatment options and medications are restricted in some fashion.

Main Treatment Availability

It’s all-too-common. It is partly avoidable and partly an inevitable step of a lack of perfectly streamlined systems. Sometimes, specialists are restricted due to disbursement and allocation caps, controlling medicine quantities or just requiring fresh production. It is also possible for the medicine to date, and resupplies are, well, in short supply.

It can also have to do with a lack of funds, support, and other practical limitations. Bova Compounding hopes to dramatically alleviate these bottleneck concerns by allowing for alternative options. When the main treatment option is not available, what can veterinary specialists do? The answer, hopes Bova Compounding, is a lot.

Nicholas Bova has helped usher in strong-armed focus on treatment in both mainstream areas of veterinary care and niche fields. The company he helps run has developed compounding medicine solutions in zoo care, rare animal care, pet stores, and farms. It’s part of the ultimate plan to relieve many specialists of the limited care options at their disposal. Compounding medicine is an alternative and customized treatment plan.

Customized Plans of Care

It is also far more flexible. Ideally, specialists could offer customized medication plans and schedules to accommodate specific needs. If the main “standardized” option is unavailable for reasons either fair or not, specialists can still provide treatment. Bova Compounding even suggests that the treatment is superior because it is custom-made to their needs at the patient level. The compounding medicine can be easily adjusted to accommodate small breeds over large breeds, adult dogs over newborns, and other adjusting factors.

Bova’s high-end laboratories craft progressive treatment options in a range of industries. This is where the impact is strongest. These niche industries (farming, zoos, etc) are most vulnerable to availability limitations. If they run out of the main treatment option to care for a tiger or giraffe, they don’t have an easily available alternative. Bova Compounding hopes to change that.

Nick Bova and His team make Sure veterinary Care Specialists Have the Answer

When medicines are most needed, they may be out of stock or discontinued. It is a legitimate issue in many veterinary circles. How do specialists keep stock of all available treatment options and prescriptions, yet work within an infrastructure that has obvious limitations? It’s a problem Bova Compounding is resolving, and fast, through a change in the dynamics of medicine and in how specialists receive it.

Industry Limitations

The industry limitations are often practical and not always avoidable. These limitations are often fair and, even in some ways, essential. One can’t just have unlimited access to all medicine. This can create some unwelcoming potential scenarios. Imagine a scenario where a specialist has free reign to all needed medicine. Any scenario can crop up (and in the area of animal care, it will). A specialist can’t just expect a certain flow of scenarios to occur because the world is vast and unpredictable.

They need access to medicine, but the specific medications they need may be out of stock due to practical limitations or high demand, discontinued due to changes or standard regulations, or altogether unavailable at the time due to any number of reasons. The specialist can’t just expect all medicine to be available at any volume at all times. This is impractical. Sometimes, it just happens.

Alternatives to the Mainstream

Bova Compounding remedies the problem not by forcing medicine to specialists who need it from these traditional sources. Bova works to offer an alternative. If a specialist can’t access the medicine they need for reasons either reasonable or not, they can work with a compound provider. The compound provider delivers the medicine when requested, in a customized and personal state.

It is the solution needed to work around often unexpected but realistically possible bottlenecks in medicine allocation. The specialists can treat and any all issues knowing they have what essentially amounts to a safety net. If they can’t receive it through the traditional supply model, they have a back-up. It is medicine tailor-made to the specific situation. Nick Bova and his team have found a way to predict any and all encounters, and to make sure that specialists of all levels have access to an answer.

Compounding for Pet Owners is a Response to a Lack of Availability

Bova Compounding seeks to remedy a common and problematic issue in the veterinary care industry. For largely positive and valued reasons, medicines are discontinued or unavailable for a temporary period of time. It is not entirely uncommon for even common drugs and medicines to be inaccessible by a local provider due to network communication, bottle-necking, availability, restrictions, or even funds.

It’s actually quite common. Some of these problems in lack of availability are avoidable and some are mostly necessary repercussions of oversight and regulation. The ultimate goal is to protect the animals, and it sometimes results in independent situations that seem bad on the surface.

Bova’s Compounding System

The focus at Bova is to pick up the pieces where regulations and discontinuations in regards to availability fall short. The system is known as compounding. Compounding for pet owners can come into effect when pet owners are severely against the wall in availability for the medicine they need.

Compounding medicine is tailor-made and customized for the veterinary care providers. When the main option is not available, veterinary care specialists can suggest a compounded product. They can have them at their disposal. The compounded alternative works around the limitations and restrictions of the main option.

These are tailor-made prescription products that fill in the gaps when the main product is unavailable. It is working brilliantly in many markets. The compound providers, such as Bova Compounding, can supply these custom alternatives at a niche scale.

Responding to Shortage

Bova understands that shortage is, in some ways, an inevitable part of veterinary care. There may also be a shortage of funds or there may always be restrictions that control allocation and disbursement. The focus at Bova is not on fixing these somewhat inevitable bottlenecks in distribution. The focus is having a response to when it does happen and working with patients who are particularly vulnerable to it happening. This could include patients with animals that need special and highly-regulated medicines or patients who have a major lack of funds.

Bova and his team are present to alleviate these situations when they arise by developing a response plan. Compounded products work in the system but around the repercussions of lack of availability.

What Type Of Dog Grooming Is Available?

In Texas, dog owners assess options for managing their pet’s coat. Professional grooming services can provide the owners with a complete menu of services. The services address conditions that make the dogs uncomfortable. They also address conditions that could make for unpleasant circumstances for the owner as well. A local pet resort provides dog grooming to manage these requirements.

Shampooing and Conditioning

Shampooing and conditioning services are available each day. If the pet owner wants to book daily or weekly services, they can achieve this objective through the resort. They can review a variety of shampoos and conditions based on the benefits the products provide. This could include controlling matting of the fur as well as lowering the chances of shedding.

Trimming and Styling the Coat

The groomers will also provide trimming and styling services for the dogs. They can create any unique style preferred by the dog owner. This includes any new trends preferred by dog owners as of late. This controls the way the dog looks and keeps their style fresh. The groomers are trained to providing color for the dog’s coat as well as beautiful new styles.

Treatments for Pests Infestations

Pest infestations are also managed through grooming services. The products that are available will kill off the existing pests. They also provide treatment to lower the chances of a new development. Additional treatments such as dip are also available for the dogs to manage conditions such as the mange more strategically.

Trimming the Nails

The dog’s nails must be trimmed regularly as well. If the nails get too long this could make the dogs uncomfortable when they walk. The groomers use specialized tools to trim their nails and prevent injuries. It is best for the dog owners to acquire these services with regular grooming services.

In Texas, dog owners review grooming services to choose the best options for their pets. The spa and resort provides a variety of services to address the dog’s needs. This includes but is not limited to shampooing, treating pest infestations, and keeping the teeth clean. Pet owners who want to book the services contact the resort now.

Why No One Talks About Talent Anymore

Get Information about 2b awards stars

Those who are searching for their stars, an online show has arrived with the goal of helping people achieve their dreams, hopes and wishes. This method is called the 2B awards having a mission statement of enhancing, improving, enriching and empowering people.

The mission of helping people attain their dreams is being supported with a network of contacts, that form a team for the 2B awards rising stars, from distinguishable directors, producers, agencies for talents, radio stations, disc jockeys, many companies and people with clout.

For those with talents that can be used in the entertainment world, know that the 2B awards rising stars has 21 categories that future stars can check out where they would fit. It is said that for every winner of each category, this program pays up to 10K each month. For those who like to get a very hefty referral fee, you will be paid if you have celebrity connections or aspiring artists, and a deal is made for this celebrity or artist to host in their show of certain category.

South Florida is the base of the 2B awards. The internet is the means of running the 2B awards with online competitions in different categories, where they provide a platform for videos to be uploaded, voted on, and then the winners will receive cash if their videos win, and a possibility of being seen by some major talent scouts.

It was Katie Barnett from Sioux Falls, South Dakota who first won the 2B awards. Because Ms. Barnett’s video got the most number of votes in the competition, 2B awards based in Fort Lauderdale, Florida gave her the $1,000.00 cash prize as her award.

According to the CEO of 2B awards, their program is to discover talents that exist in every corner of the world whether big or small in locality, and the result is what the program is meant to be.

According to Ms. Barnett who is a 29 year old mother and has a dream of being a teacher in music, said she entered the competition because of her love in singing, and did not imagine of winning the competition. Aside from the $1,000.00 money award of Ms. Barnett, agents and promoters can now be viewing her video and get the chance to be known in the world of professional music industry.

2B awards has become the outlet and source of opportunity for ordinary people with great talents, to be seen and heard all over the world, a privilege that only those belonging to famous families in the industry or with connections had. This show has become a playing field where talent is the judge and not connections.

What Almost No One Knows About Tips

Factors to Consider When Looking for the Best Photographer

We are living in a digital world most of the things have changed from the way they used to be, this has been greatly influenced by the advancement in technology which keeps son changing on daily basis. Advancement in technology has made work easier even when it comes to matters to nod with photos. When you are looking for a best photographer to do the shooting for you ,you need to find someone who will give you what you want or more and nothing less .

Below are the tips on how to get the best photographer. The best photographer is the owner that has experience, passion, and knowledge of how to take great photos. Not everyone can be good at it and owning a camera doesn’t mean that you can take great photos.

If you can get a [photographer that when you pay him you will get something to save from that that is the best person to go for . At any given time you should work within your means to ensure that you don’t have financial struggles. Being expensive doesn’t mean being since some the photographer’s charges expensively and ended up doing a shoddy job and those who charge cheap does wonderful or the vice vasa

Depending on the event, your expectation and the your needs make sure that the photographer you choose will help you to achieve your purpose . You should able to have one on one conversation with the photographer just to make sure that you got the assurance that he can do it .

You can visit the photographer website, call him or get recommendation that the [photographer you are going for has it all. Photos experts ensure that they are able to do as per expectation since they know failure to that means that loss of those customers.

Know the reliability of the customer’s weather is someone you can strike a deal with or not . For the sake of future the professional photographers not only want to give the quality of work but they also want to have a long-lasting relationship with the client for more shots .

When you are looking for a photographer you need to have a list of some few so that from that many lists you are able to get the best of all. When you select the best photographer it gives you peace of mind knowing that everything will go as per the plan.